Costa Rica: The Whirlwind Tour

3-11 February 2018

After completing three months of intensive avian fieldwork in the Talamanca Highlands and Caribbean Coast, I have a little over a week to burn before leaving the country and am eager to see new landscapes and their associated birds. Below are some photo highlights from this nine-day circuit, which covered the southern foothills, the Pacific coastline including the the Osa and Nicoya Peninsulas, and lastly, the Volcán Arenal.

Note: The bird in the banner photo is a Silver-throated Tanager (Tangara icterocephala).

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Broad-billed Motmot (Electron platyrhynchum)
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Yellow-throated Toucan (Ramphastos ambiguus)
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Buff-rumped Warbler (Myiothlypis fulvicauda)
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Cherrie’s Tanager (Ramphocelus costaricensis)
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Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii)
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Cocoa Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus susurrans)
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Speckled Tanager (Ixothraupis guttata)
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Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica)
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Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) from the Nicoya Peninsula ferry.
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Double-striped Thick-knee (Burhinus bistriatus)
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Golden-hooded Tanager (Tangara larvata)

 

 

The Land of Turtles

While our current position with Costa Rica Bird Observatories is primarily based out of the highlands, Steve and I also have the privilege of working on the Caribbean Coast for several days each month. Compared to the cold, wet, and windy highlands, the Caribbean’s warm weather is a nice change, even though tropical rainstorms are prevalent. Even more so, the birds of this region are entirely different. From Madre Selva (our highlands base near San Isidro), we descend the mountain towards the Caribbean coast. After a series of bus rides and a boat trip, we arrive in Tortuguero, a small beach town only accessible by river.

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During the two hour boat ride, one can see crocodiles, caimans, iguanas, and Green Ibis.

Tortuguero means “The Land of Turtles” in Spanish, and the beach here is the Western Hemisphere’s most important nesting site for the endangered Green Turtle. During our first visit to Tortuguero, we were lucky to catch the tail end of turtle nesting season, which ends in November.

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A Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling entering the ocean for the first time. If it reaches adulthood, this tiny turtle could live more than 80 years and reach a weight of over 400 lbs (180 kg).

We are here specifically to band birds, so we get to work. Over the course of five days, we band at five different locations. Our sites consist of both primary and secondary forests, some near the beach and some along rivers. During this banding cycle at Tortuguero, we capture a nice variety of birds. For the resident birds, we capture Bronzy Hermit, Stripe-throated Hermit, Long-billed Hermit, Green-breasted Mango, Rufous-tailed Hummingbird, American Pygmy Kingfisher, Streak-headed Woodcreeper, Boat-billed Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Elaenia, Red-capped Manakin, White-collared Manakin, Checker-throated Antwren, Chestnut-backed Antbird, Western Slaty-Antshrike, Clay-colored Thrush, White-breasted Wood-Wren, and Olive-backed Euphonia. As well, we capture some overwintering migrants from North America. These include, Wood Thrush, Swainson’s Thrush, Gray Catbird, Red-eyed Vireo, Prothonotary Warbler, and Northern Waterthrush.

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Chestnut-backed Antbird (Poliocrania exsul)
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Checker-throated Antwren (Epinecrophylla fulviventris)
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Mantled Howler Monkey (Alouatta palliata)

Great Green Macaws (Ara ambiguus)

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Bare-throated Tiger-Heron (Tigrisoma mexicanum)
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Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus)

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Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary, Belize

31 March – 2 April, 2017

As I near the end of my five months in Central America, I visit Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary, a lagoon in Belize famous for harboring multitudes of birds in early spring. Most of these birds are North American migrants staging for their migration back north. Just like the migrants, I am staging for my flight back north as well.

For three days, I intensively bird the sanctuary by canoe and foot. In the process, I meet friendly local birders and even an enthusiastic young birder. Two of the birders (Francis Canto and Ernaldo Bustamante), are kind enough to show me the elusive Pinnated Bittern. Below is a selection of my favorite images.

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Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (Dendrocygna autumnalis)
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Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria)
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Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria)

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Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)
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Pinnated Bittern (Botaurus pinnatus)
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Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus)
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Bare-throated Tiger Heron (Tigrisoma mexicanum)
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Wood Storks (Mycteria americana)
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Fledgling and adult female Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus obscurus)
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Fledgling Vermilion Flycatcher
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Great Egrets, White Ibis, and Roseate Spoonbills congregating on the lagoon.
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Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea)

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Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) hunting for snails.
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Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus)